Historical Museum of Southern Florida

Santo Domingo
Santo Domingo (Dominican Republic)

VISIONS OF THE CARIBBEAN

TOWNS AND CITIES

European colonization of the Caribbean involved not only the development of plantations but the establishment of towns for administration and commerce. Early town plans drawn by artists and mapmakers illustrate central plazas or squares surrounded by layouts of streets, typically in a grid pattern.

Roseau
Roseau (Dominica) 

Artists also drew perspective views of port towns and cities, often with ship-filled harbors in the foreground. Such views suggest the economic significance of towns and cities as centers for trade in agricultural products and other goods.

postcard
Port of Spain (Trinidad)  

Also common are drawings and photographs that focus on the architecture of colonial power, such as forts, walls, churches, administrative buildings and schools.

Havana festival
Havana (Cuba)  

Illustrators of Caribbean towns and cities were fascinated by the region's vibrant street life. Drawings and photographs capture the diverse social classes and ethnic groups that inhabited Caribbean urban centers and portray their interactions in public spaces. Diverse styles of dress are meticulously documented. In addition, images of carnivals and other festivals depict the temporary transformation of the urban environment into a setting for revelry and artistic expression through masquerades and other performances.

Next: Agriculture & Rural Life

VISIONS OF THE CARIBBEAN
The Exhibit | Overview | Exploration & Colonization | Towns & Cities
Agriculture & Rural Life | Natural History & Disasters | Government & Rebellions | Tourism

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OF SOUTHERN FLORIDA

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